Tag Archives: Nisqually Glacier

Deadhorse Creek Trail and Moraine Trail

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The Paradise area is filled with wildflowers this time of year, and the fields are filled with bright-spotted beauties while the trails are packed with eager photographers and outdoor enthusiasts.  In can be tricky trying to find any solitude at Paradise this time of year, but Deadhorse Creek Trail and the Moraine Trail to the west side of Paradise are good options for getting away from the crowds.

The easiest way to begin is to park in the lower parking lot at Paradise, which is southwest of the Visitor Center.  This 2.5 mile hike is moderate with wide trails that are paved for a portion of the walk. There is a 400 ft elevation gain that takes place mostly within the first .75 mile, with the middle section of the hike flattening out, and the descent on the return.

From the trailhead at the lower parking lot, take the well-marked trail due north, bearing right at the first Y-intersection. If you park in the main Paradise parking lot, head up the stairs to where most of the trails begin and cut hard to your left.  You’ll be paralleling the Visitor Center on the Avalanche Lily Trail and you’ll cross the Alta Vista Trail, and then you’ll come to the T intersection of Deadhorse Creek Trail where you will take a right.

Once you’re on Deadhorse Creek Trail there is no way to go wrong, as there are many other trails that intersect Deadhorse.  You can turn around if you are tired or let your feet guide you towards the glacier, a field of flowers, into the valley, or towards a creek.  If you continue to follow Deadhorse Creek Trail, after about 3/4 of a mile you will have the option to turn left onto the Moraine Trail.

The Moraine Trail is not a loop, but it does take you right down to the “snout” of the Nisqually Glacier. Most visitors skip this option as the trail is unpaved and easy to overlook.  The Moraine Trail is a great place to veer off the more-frequented Deadhorse Creek Trail, dip over a rise and head down into the valley where the Nisqually Glacier sits.  You can find a few rocks to relax upon and soak up the quiet of your own corner of Paradise before retracing your steps on the Moraine Trail and rejoining Deadhorse Creek.  If you choose to turn back now, the round-trip hike would be just under 2.5 miles.   I recommend taking a left on Deadhorse Creek and continuing on a bit higher.

The Deadhorse Creek Trail meets up with the Skyline Trail after a half mile, and you could either take a right on the Skyline Trail to head back towards the Paradise Visitor Center Parking Lot, or you could push on another .2 miles for a spectacular view from the Glacier Vista trail. Either way, once you begin heading down the Skyline Trail you could also opt to switch over to the Alta Vista Trail after a .5 mile.  At this point, head wherever the beauty calls to you or wherever there are less people to mar your view.  All trails had back to the Paradise Visitor Center Parking Lot, or if you cut to the right (west) on the Waterfall Trail or the Avalanche Lily Trail, they will bring you back down to the lower parking lot.

Any path at Paradise is going to provide you with spectacular views and wildflowers through the rest of the month. Prepare to be awed!

In the Rain: Carter Falls and Madcap Falls

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We know how it is; you plan for your trip, you get excited, you see the mountain from the road (almost there!), then, on the day of the trip- snow at paradise, and raining everywhere else. We know, because it happened to us too. It’s always unfortunate when you can’t see the mountain because of weather, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the park and the many other views it has to offer.

When we woke up the day of our hike and checked the weather reports (always important!), we saw that there was a storm warning at paradise, and it was raining cats and dogs everywhere else. Checking the weather beforehand and talking to the rangers at the park helped, and so we changed our plans. Instead of a hike near Paradise, that would put us at snow level, we opted for a lower elevation hike in the trees for partial rain coverage. The perfect trail for that? Carter and Madcap Falls.

The Carter Falls and Madcap Falls trail is a 1.1 mile part of the Wonderland Trail, a 92 mile trail that goes around Mt. Rainier National Park. The trailhead is across from the Cougar Rock Campground, about 8 miles from the park entrance, with parking off the side of the road.

The hike starts by crossing the Nisqually riverbed; including walking across a log bridge- kids should have an adult cross with them to be safe. The cliffs across the river are spotted with long, graceful waterfalls, and if there are no clouds, Mt. Rainier can be seen looking up the river. Once you are on the other side of the river you head up into the trees and start making your way to the falls, with the river on your right. It is an uphill hike, but not a steep one.

Carter Falls is a spectacular waterfall with an 80 ft drop. A nice reward for your hike! Just past Carter Falls, 1/10th of a mile up is Madcap Falls, a smaller set of waterfalls in the Nisqually. Fun Fact: the Nisqually River, which flows from the Nisqually Glacier seen above Paradise to the left, feeds Alder Lake, a large lake you pass if you’re entering the park from the southwest.

Hiking is great in that it isn’t necessarily a fair-weather sport. As long as you are prepared, i.e. a waterproof coat, gloves, appropriate shoes, etc., you can still go out in the rain. Wildlife is still out and about, but there are fewer crowds. Check out other good hikes in bad weather in our previous blog ‘Don’t Let the Rain Stop You.’ If you do go out in bad weather, make sure you know the conditions beforehand, you’re prepared, and safe.

Lake Alder adventures

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Trying to get out of the crowds, and into some water?  With this heat wave, it can be great to take a break from hiking in the sun, and spend part of your Mt. Rainier visit lounging on Alder Lake!

About 15 minutes before the Nisqually entrance to Mt. Rainier lay one of the jewels of the Nisqually Valley.  As the Nisqually River flows from the Nisqually Glacier, through the park, and through Ashford (passing just a mile from our Visitor Center), it empties it’s jade-colored water into Alder Lake at Elbe.  Formed by Alder Dam, Alder Lake stretches 7 miles, past the town of Alder, winding along HWY 7.

There are three fantastic parks for your family’s enjoyment (all part of the Alder Lake Park system).  If you have a paddleboard, kayak, canoe, motorboat, jetskis, or other water vessel – bring it along! Park fun includes swimming areas, boat launches, barbeques, bathrooms, playgrounds, and plenty of picnic space – but not all three parks include all facilities.  Read on for the what’s what of Alder Lake summer fun!

Driving west from the Ashford Visitor’s Center on SR 706, you’ll reach Elbe after 7 miles, and join HWY 7.  Drive through Elbe, and you’ll see the first park, Rocky Point Campground on your left.  With the least facilities of the three parks, Rocky Point is best used for it’s boat launch, camping and fishing.  There are a couple of picnic tables, but there is not a swimming area. There are 25 campsites with electric and water hookups, and a bathroom facility. You can fish for largemouth bass, rainbow and cutthroat trout from this westernmost area of the lake, and the boat launch is free of charge.  It is a great option for launching the boat when the other parks are super-busy! More info can be found at http://www.mytpu.org/tacomapower/parks-recreation/alder-lake-park/rocky-point-campground.htm

Sunny Beach Point is 3 miles further west along HWY 7. There is a swimming beach, a sheltered picnic area, restrooms, and 20 picnic tables with grills. Sunny Beach Point is open May 15th – September 15th, and there is always free entry.  No alcohol allowed, and there is no camping. Pets are welcomed on-leash. More information can be found at http://www.mytpu.org/tacomapower/parks-recreation/alder-lake-park/sunny-beach-point.htm

Alder Lake Park is .6 miles west along HWY 7 from Sunny Beach Park. Alder Lake Park is the most expansive of the parks by far, with a swimming area, boat launch, and 149 campsites. There are coin-operated showers and restrooms.  The park has free entrance on weekdays, and a $5 parking fee on weekends and holidays.  If the day-use parking lot is full, the gates will be closed, but that does not mean the park itself is closed! Open year-round.  More info at http://www.mytpu.org/tacomapower/parks-recreation/alder-lake-park/

Bring your family, dogs, swimsuits, and a picnic blanket and soak in the beauty of Alder Lake.  Summer doesn’t get much better than lake swimming, bbqing, boating and camping!

Details:

Rocky Point Campground
52910 Mountain Highway E
Eatonville, WA 98328

Sunny Beach Point:
50316 Mountain Hwy E
Eatonville, WA 98328

Alder Lake Park
50324 School Rd
Eatonville, WA 98328

For all 3 parks (all part of the Alder Lake Park system):
Park office: (360) 569-2778
Fishing and recreation line: (888) 502-8690

*Note – while State Highway 7/Mountain Highway is closed to through traffic for construction this summer, the parks are still accessible, as they are considered local traffic. Coming from the south, continue through road closure signs.  From the north, follow the detour routes, until you can pass the road closure signs from the south as directed above.